Gaijin Gunpla

Poor Strike Freedom. He was atop my work table, being adored for not only his rugged good looks but also the sleekness of his design then along came Tallgeese and Mr. Full Burst had to move aside. I had planned on getting a review of the Tallgeese up quickly, but then ran into some kind of computer issue, which set me back on the photography of the Tallgeese. While I wait to get the photos taken and edited, I thought I’d give the Strike Freedom Full Burst another moment in the spotlight.

More than any other aspect of the design I like the legs of the Strike Freedom. Actually, I think I could say that about almost all kits. So, having put together the upper half of the suit I now get to focus my attention on my favourite half. Err.


You can see there isn’t much to the upper leg frame of the SF but you do insert one little piece before closing up the poly-cap. Onto those parts you clip on the front armor piece.

For the lower leg you take the ‘lame gold’ piece and attach it to the extra finish armor parts that show at the knee.

But before you close that up to complete the leg you first need these things.

As well as needing to assemble the flap that comes out the back of the lower leg.

See how everything fits in there.

Now I just need the second lower leg and extra finish knee parts.

When I got to this point I thought about how much in common the PG and MG have with each other. For the most part, the structure is the same, except the PG parts are bigger. Even the armor is the same (if my failing memory is correct).

After putting on the largest of the armor parts you then put on the smaller parts for the side of the leg and the knee.


In this shot you can see the extra finish ankle assembly that clips into the bottom of the leg. I gotta admit, that extra finish looks sexy.

When it comes to the feet the assembly is pretty straightforward though the pegs that are used to connect the white armor part on the foot are found on a separate frame part instead of on the large forward frame part.

Considering how much of the frame shows on the foot, perhaps Bandai should have taken the idea of using extra finish parts for this area into consideration.

Still, that’s one good looking leg.

And I should know. I am a leg aficionado. I like me them legs. Today I had KFC for lunch.

With those done the manual then has you build the large weapons which are found on the side skirts, or should I say, found in place of the side skirts.



These were really straightforward and a lot simpler than their PG brothers.

A small piece is inserted into an armor part.

Surprise! It’s a ball joint!


That’s as far as I was able to get that day. As much as I wanted to continue on and at least do the skirt which would allow me to assemble the suit I had to stop and get on with that thing called real life. Damn you, real life! Always getting in the way.

9 Responses so far.

  1. ClayCannonII says:

    Go home real life, no one likes you

  2. Reehdus says:

    Hmm…I never really did understand the appeal of a full gold frame, I’ve always pictured an internal frame to be a mechanical grey kinda deal.

    • Dingo says:

      Cuz gold is waay sexier than dull metal 😀 (jk). To be honest, I got the same question just like you, since there is no place officially explained why they used gold alloy for the frame (maybe ZAFT is super rich, or the outer space has more gold for them to stay wealthy?)

      • Ryan says:

        It’s apparently explained in the manual. The gold material is a unique alloy created for the Stargazer to endure extreme G forces. Apparently it’s the only material they could find to endure the G forces of a true coordinators mobile suit. That’s why the Stargazer has a gold frame too.

  3. Sanzo says:

    I’m glad to see you get back to the Strike, but you seems to be forgetting about finishing the mg 2.0 gelgoog! I would love to see more of it. Keep up the great builds

  4. SavviMaple says:

    Lovely gold indeed, but I do love the platinum gold paints some kit builders use, looks so “bling”.

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